What is

DUIKERSDRIFT

Duikersdrift is a working farm in the age-old Cape tradition, with a small vineyard and olive orchard and paddocks with horses, donkeys and amazing birdlife. Being surrounded by mountain wilderness, there are also a number of wild small animal species that call the farm home. Visitors to the guesthouse are treated to gorgeous mountain views, laid back farm-style living, and a range of on- and off-site activities that will cater to most interests. Knowledgeable guides lead guests on tours to the west coast, Cape Town and the surrounding wine valleys, as well as the cultural, historical and viticultural highlights of the Tulbagh valley itself. The farm-style restaurant caters to all tastes with wholesome meals while the more adventurous can take a mountain bike and picnic on the farm. The restaurant has a farm-to-table philosophy with olives harvested from the orchard providing oil and there is also a vineyard of Shiraz grapes.

The pool area overlooks the Saronsberg Mountain. Guests and visitors can make use of the full range of activities such as picnicking, hiking, mountain biking, bird watching and viewing & feeding of farm animals.
There is also an extensive recreational area for children. Duikersdrift is a child friendly establishment.

FEELS LIKE HOME

just better

SITUATED IN A

charming historic town

ACTIVITIES & TOURS

that make you smile

FAMILY & PET

friendly establishment

Location from

CAPE TOWN CITY CENTRE, VIA WELLINGTON

  • Take the N1, northbound, from Cape Town towards Paarl.
  • Exit the N1 at junction 47, onto R44 sign-posted Stellenbosch/Klapmuts/Wellington. Turn left at the off-ramp junction towards Wellington (R44).
  • Continue on R44 towards Wellington and after 21,5km continue straight at the 4-way stop.
  • After about 3km turn left at a set of traffic lights into Distillery Road – this is a continuation of the R44.
  • Continue for 1,5km and then go straight through 2 sets of traffic lights.
  • Continue straight and after 41,5km there will be the Gouda / Porterville R44 turn to the left. Go straight.
  • The R44 now becomes the R46 after the turn left to Gouda and proceeds towards Ceres, entering the Nuwekloof Pass.
  • 2km after passing through the Nuwekloof Pass, turn left at the Tulbagh sign.
  • Continue 1.5km and turn left at the Rhodes Food Group / La Rhone sign.
  • After 3km you will come to a junction with Montpellier Wine Estate on the left. Cross over the tar road onto the dirt track.
  • After 2,2km, turn left at the white entrance wall and gates into Duikersdrift.

Location from

CAPE TOWN AIRPORT, VIA WELLINGTON

  • Follow the N2 signs from the airport and then after 1km take the N2 Somerset West exit.
  • Travel eastwards on the N2 and after 6km take the R300 Bellville exit.
  • Stay on this main road for 17km until taking the #27 exit to the N1 Paarl / Worcester.
  • After 21,5km take #47 exit from the N1, sign-posted R44 Stellenbosch/Klapmuts/Wellington. Turn left at the off-ramp junction towards Wellington (R44).
  • Continue on R44 towards Wellington and after 21,5km continue straight at the 4-way stop.
  • After about 3km turn left at a set of traffic lights into Distillery Road – this is a continuation of the R44.
  • Continue for 1,5km and then go straight through 2 sets of traffic lights.
  • Continue straight and after 41,5km there will be the Gouda / Porterville R44 turn to the left. Go straight.
  • The R44 now becomes the R46 after the turn left to Gouda and proceeds towards Ceres, entering the Nuwekloof Pass.
  • 2km after passing through the Nuwekloof Pass, turn left at the Tulbagh sign.
  • Continue 1.5km and turn left at the Rhodes Food Group / La Rhone sign.
  • After 3km you will come to a junction with Montpellier Wine Estate on the left. Cross over the tar road onto the dirt track.
  • After 2,2km, turn left at the white entrance wall and gates into Duikersdrift.

The farm

DUIKERSDRIFT

This 34Ha (85 acre) farm is a portion of The Old Drostdy, one of the original large farms in the valley in the 1700s. It has undergone many transformations since then, serving mostly as an agricultural farm for vegetables and fruit orchards, most notably apricots, as well as wine and olive production. It has also historically been important as a grazing area for livestock, mostly cattle, horses and donkeys and the strong water is also an attraction to waterbirds and animals in the dry season.

The current vineyard of Shiraz grapes was planted in 2006 with new rootstocks while the olive orchard contains three types of olives: Frantoia for premium extra-virgin olive oil, Mission for oil and table olives and Kalamata for table olives.

The current owners, Trevor and Caroline Carnaby, chose to retain the historical Dutch name of the farm. A ‘duiker’ is a small solitary antelope found throughout southern Africa and shortly after purchasing the property they had a few encounters with these antelope in the fields and vineyards and felt that the name was therefore appropriate. Their vision to transform Duikersdrift into a typical Cape Winelands tourism product, offering warm hospitality, genuine family activities, contemporary farm-style accommodation and great food has culminated in the development of the Winelands Country Escape, providing the ideal setting for visitors to enjoy laid-back activities in a stress-free environment.

Duikersdrift

MISSION STATEMENT

To create a property where visitors can truly escape from the pressures and stresses of modern living. Somewhere they can ‘recharge the batteries’, get in touch with nature once again and nourish the soul. A place for families…. and of memories.

We believe this is best achieved in an environment that is genuinely unpretentious and authentic while providing opportunities for outdoor activities and experiences that will have a positive impact on the psyche.

Central to this philosophy is a team of well-trained, friendly and hospitable management & staff with an unwaivering dedication and commitment to excellence while endeavouring to provide superlative and professional service and experiences; a guest product with personality and charm; and a property that is managed in a sustainable manner with benefits to the resident wildlife, community and region as a whole.

In the care of our expert and charismatic guides, visitors will have enriching and profound experiences as they are shown the incredible history, natural beauty and personalities of the region.

Duikersdrift

HISTORY

The village of Tulbagh
Tulbagh is a charming, historic small town about 1,5 hours from Cape Town. Nestled in an amphitheatre created by the Winterhoek, Witzenberg and Obiqua mountains, the area offers outstanding natural beauty and is known for its country living and hospitality. Many small mountain tributaries run into the Kleinberg River that snakes through the valley.

The valley has been inhabited for millennia by indigenous San and Khoi people but was ‘discovered’ in 1658 by Pieter Potter, the surveyor to the first Governor of the Cape, Jan van Riebeeck. The area was initially settled in 1699 by a handful of pioneering farmers but the town itself was only really established when the church was built in 1743, and was originally called ‘Het Land van Waveren’, but was later changed to Tulbagh in honour of the Cape Dutch Colony Governor (1751-1771), Ryk Tulbagh and the town has retained its historical nature to this day.

During the time of the Voortrekkers – Dutch settlers that began moving northwards from 1835-1846 – Tulbagh was the last civilised town in the Cape before entering the unchartered interior.

Tulbagh started as a small settlement and proceeded to develop slowly, meaning that as architectural styles developed, the town’s architecture grew more diverse. Church Street is the ultimate testament to this diversity, featuring Cape Dutch architecture, Edwardian and Victorian homes. The village boasts the highest concentration of declared historical monument buildings in South Africa as well as the country’s oldest functioning church that still retains its original infrastructure.

Tulbagh is also known for the 1969 earthquake measuring 6.3 on the Richter scale – the most destructive in South Africa’s history – that destroyed a large amount of the town’s diverse and beautiful architecture. Shortly thereafter, large projects were underway to restore what had been lost or damaged, resulting in Church Street being recognised for having the most Cape-Dutch, Edwardian and Victorian Heritage Sites on a single street in South Africa and even today the town has the ‘feel’ of an 18th Century village. The town is a delight for architecture enthusiasts since it is rare to find such a concentration of historic buildings still in everyday use outside of Asia, Europe or North America.

The emphasis on history continues today through the valley and all structures older than 60 years old are protected and maintained, including the spaces surrounding them.

Whilst the larger herd animals have left the valley, smaller animals are still fairly abundant, seeking refuge in the mountains, vineyards and orchards. Baboons, small antelope called duiker, porcupines, mongooses, wild cats, genets, foxes and even leopards, although elusive, can still be seen from time to time. Birdlife is also spectacular with the country’s national bird, the beautiful Blue Crane, being found in the valley and surrounds while jackal-buzzards and other birds of prey patrol the open spaces for food. Part of the Cape Floral Kingdom, the smallest and most diverse of the world’s 6 floral kingdoms, the valley is also home to wonderful wildflowers (fynbos) attracting an abundance of small colourful birds such as the Cape Sugarbird that feeds on from the magnificent proteas found in abundance in the valley.

Renowned for it’s wine route that is part of Route 62 – the longest wine route in the world, Tulbagh also produces good local cheeses, Belgian chocolates and olives and has become a wedding destination of choice. It is also one of the best places in South Africa to experience snow (usually on the surrounding mountains) in Winter and is host to the largest ‘Christmas in July’ festival in the country.

For the more adventurous there are hiking trails and mountain bike routes through the valley and into the surrounding mountains while the 30 000 ha (75 000 acre) mountainous Groot Winterhoek Wilderness reserve beckons just to the north of the valley.

Duikersdrift

FARM ANIMALS

  • Horses
  • Donkeys

Surrounding

WILDLIFE

The following birds can be seen on the farm and in the general valley area:

  • Blue crane (SA National Bird)
  • African fish-eagle
  • Purple heron
  • Jackal buzzard
  • Red-knobbed coot
  • African spoonbill,
  • Yellow-billed duck
  • Red-billed teal
  • Common moorhen
  • African darter
  • Reed cormorant
  • Blacksmith lapwing
  • Spotted thick-knee
  • Western barn owl
  • Cape eagle-owl

The following mammals can be seen on the farm and in the general valley area:

  • Bat-eared fox
  • Black-backed jackal
  • Cape mountain leopard
  • Striped polecat (zorilla)
  • Small-spotted genet
  • Small grey mongoose
  • Bush duiker

Other wildlife that can be seen on the farm and in the general valley area:

  • Scorpions
    Thick-tailed scorpions (potentially dangerously venomous)
    Thin-tailed scorpions (not dangerously venomous)
  • Spiders
    Black button spider (dangerously venomous)
    Brown button spider (potentially dangerously venomous)
  • Solifuges
  • Snakes
    Cape Cobra
    Common centipede eater
    Puff adder
    Red-lipped herald snake
    Brown house snake

The farm

Managers

Shane Reynolds – Farm manager
Shayne Reynolds – Restaurant and Farmstall manager